Species Detail

Ribes sp. L.
Currant


Scientific Name:  
Ribes sp. L.
Common Name:  
Currant
Myaamia Name:  
No Myaamia Name
Uses:  
Food
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Ribes sp. L.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
No Reference Specified Description  Bunches are not as large as common grapes
No Reference Specified Use - Food  traditional food. In the traditional story of Young Thunder William Pecongah; he describes the crops he had growing on his land 160 acres of reserve in central Indiana. "There I planted corn; wheat; potatoes; peas; tobacco; beans; apple trees; pumpkins; watermelons; cucumbers; onions; hay; straw; gooseberries; raspberries; blackberries; currants; turnips; tomatoes; pawpaws; cherries; strawberries; plums; blackhaws; peaches; walnut trees; pecans; hickory nuts; barley and rye."
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  "asandapakwi"
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  eehsipanimini
Botanical Sources  
Ribes sp. L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   There are six native currant species. Five of these species Spiny swamp-currant; R. lacustre; Skunk-currant; R. glandulosum; Western black currant; R. hudsonianum; Eastern black currant; R. americanum; Swamp red currant; R. triste occur in wet areas including swamps; bogs; woods in the eastern Miami lands. A sixth native species Buffalo-currant; R. odoratum occurs on rocky cliffs and hillsides predominately in western Miami lands. Two exotic currants Garden black currant; R. nigrum; Garden red currant; R. sativum occur as escapes from areas where cultivated throughout eastern and western Miami lands.;
Related Sources  
Ribes sp. L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Racoon grapes; or coon grapes used a similar Miami-Illinois term to Dunns word for currant; "esepanimini"
No Reference Specified   These grapes are described as "assipana ssandepakwi; racoon grapes; a sour grape relished by racoons but not eaten by people; the bunches not solarge as of common grapes; it is preferable to call this grape assipanimina