Species Detail

Sagittaria latifolia Willd.
Common arrowhead


Scientific Name:  
Sagittaria latifolia Willd.
Common Name:  
Common arrowhead
Myaamia Name:  
waakihpena
Uses:  
Food
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Sagittaria latifolia Willd.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
No Reference Specified Use - Food  cassicassireca8aki, 8abisipiniki; p8kc8re8aki sont cordees [stringy]; ne sont plus bonnes [are better]; type of water onions; wild lotuses
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  type of water onions; or tubers. "8abipeniki; oignons doux"
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  bulbs coming in water; white potatoes; "oignons venant dans leau; pomme de terre blanches"
No Reference Specified Horticultural Info  Village location sometimes was chosen for its nearness to an abundance of root crops that attracted vast numbers of birds in the autumn when the marshes were dry. These root crops were quite possibly arrowhead; and the Illinois probably placed their village close to the portion of the lake that had an abundance of tubers available
No Reference Specified Ecological Info  "We camped near where the Shawnee hills now stand; from which point to the Indianola ferry where the bridge now spans the Kaw; was a swamp or dry lake; and in this lake the wild potatoes grew in abundance. As we laid ourselves down to sleep that night our lullaby was the crunch of the wild hog as he masticated the wild potato; of which he was very fond"
Botanical Sources  
Sagittaria latifolia Willd.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Occurs in ponds; streams and swamps throughout eastern and western Miami lands
Related Sources  
Sagittaria latifolia Willd.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   "Topeka" means "a place to find small or wild potatoes" in the Kaw language
No Reference Specified   Robert Vezina has determined that the word 8abissipena is the Illinois word for an edible arrowhead
No Reference Specified   Gravier used the Ojibwe/Algonquin term for arrowhead to translate the Illinois term; implying that historically the same word referred to Sagittaria latifolia; in both languages. In Ojibwe; the word waabiziipin appears to mean swan potato; however the word has no morpheme for water in it. There is still some discussion about the Miami word and its actual meaning