Species Detail

Scirpus validus Vahl.
Softstem bullrush


Scientific Name:  
Scirpus validus Vahl.
Common Name:  
Softstem bullrush
Myaamia Name:  
alaansooni
Uses:  
Material, Customs
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Scirpus validus Vahl.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
No Reference Specified Use - Material  long mats or smaller mats; to be used as bed mats; approximately the size of settlers beds circa 1895. When to be used as a bed mat; it is our size of beds and laid on the ground"
No Reference Specified Use - Material  bed mat that is the length and width of settlers beds circa 1909; and is laid bare on the ground
No Reference Specified Use - Material  mats made from rushes. "At night most of the men; seated like dogs on mats of round reeds; play with straws"
No Reference Specified Use - Customs  rush mat used for dancing upon during peace-making ceremony
No Reference Specified Use - Material  women are in charge of making the mats
No Reference Specified Use - Customs  pre-war singing. "they invite them to a feast and tell them that the time is approaching to go in search of men; so it is well to pay homage; according to their custom; to their birds so that these may be favorable. They all answer with a loud Ho! And after eating with great appetite they all go get their mats and spread out their birds on a skin stretched in the midle of the cabin and with the chichicoyas they sing a whole night . . . "
No Reference Specified Use - Material  mat made of softstem bullrush used as a bundle for carrying herbal medicines to cure those wounded in war. "the commander carries his mat; into which all his men have put their birds; along with a good stock of herbs for healing the wounded"
No Reference Specified Use - Customs  they sit on their mats during a healing ceremony; put on by the medicine men and women; to instill belief in their powers among the young
No Reference Specified Use - Material  used to make mats for sitting on. " Every young man has a little mat made of the round reeds I have mentioned which grow in the marshes. The women dye them black; yellow and red and make them three feet long and two feet wide. They fold over one end about a foot in the form of a comb case and in which they put some of these birds of which I have spoken [i.e. war bundles]"
No Reference Specified Use - Material  finely woven mats made. "Their [the Illinois] Cabins are coverd with Mats of flat Rushes; so closely woven together; that no Wind; Rain; or Snow can go thro it [153]." ". . .the Illinois; make their Cabins of flat Rushes; which they sew together; and line them with the same. . . [167]."
No Reference Specified Use - Material  during the summer months of cultivation; April through October; permanent villages were inhabited; and during this time women gathered wild foods and mat materials as well
No Reference Specified Use - Material  coverings and floorings for dwellings. "Their cabins are very large; they are made; coverd; and pavd with mats of marish [marsh]-rushes"
No Reference Specified Use - Customs  Guests are given their finest mats on which to rest. "A stranger as soon as he arrives [at a cabin--Blairs brackets] is made to sit down on a mat; of the handsomeest; in order to rest from his fatigue . . ."
No Reference Specified Use - Material  used for making long mats. "lansuni; long mats are manufactured from a round stemmed scirpus-reed growing in the Indian territory"
No Reference Specified Use - Material  The Peorias made a long mat; lasuni; from scirpus growing in these parts. One of these is a flat scirpus [probably cattail]; pakwayaki "used for roofs; thatching; the other round scirpus; lasonaki. This is a bed mat and is just the length and width of our beds; laid bare on the ground"
No Reference Specified Horticultural Info  ". . . one of them went off three or four arpents into a hollow; which in spring is nothing but a sort of marsh and brought back a bundle of round reeds as thick as one fingers."
Botanical Sources  
Scirpus validus Vahl.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Occurs in marshes and muddy shores of lakes and streams; tolerant of alkalai
No Reference Specified   Occurs in marshes
Related Sources  
Scirpus validus Vahl.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   The word mizanikani means fabric; straw; or any other rushes Scirpus spp. that were used for the purposes listed
No Reference Specified   There is a coiled basket that is possibly made of softstem bullrush; housed at the National Museum of the American Indian; in Washington D.C.
No Reference Specified   Algonquian women; in general; made the mats for roofing or flooring of dwellings. They also carried these mats when they traveled by foot. "The obligations of women are to . . .make . . . mats of rushes either flat or round; or long to serve as roofing for the cabins or as mattresses. . . . When they are traveling; the women carry the roofing for the cabin; if there is no canoe.
No Reference Specified   Upon the death of a mans brother Algonquians; neighbors to the surviving brother offer the deceased two gifts in order to remove the tears of his relatives; a mat to lie on and a piece of bark to shelter the corpse from the weather. "In the speech which they [neighbors] accompany this gift they declare that it is made in order to wipe away the tears of his relatives; and that the mat which they give him is for him to lie on; or [that they give--Blairs note] a piece of bark to shelter his corpse from the injurious effects of the weather"
No Reference Specified   The Miami-Illinois term "keentowasiki" is used generally for rush; or bulrush. Gatschet notes that it is probably an adjective word; meaning "sharp-cutting"