Species Detail

Thuja occidentalis L.
Northern white cedar


Scientific Name:  
Thuja occidentalis L.
Common Name:  
Northern white cedar
Myaamia Name:  
No Myaamia Name
Uses:  
Technology
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Thuja occidentalis L.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
No Reference Specified Description  Two species were commonly called white cedar; according to Small; including Thuja occidentalis; and Chamaecyparis thoides; also known as cypress; but is found predominately on the coastal plain
No Reference Specified Use - Technology  used as a baseboard when hand-starting fires. "One of the pieces of wood which they use to make a fire is of white cedar; which is the most combustible; a foot long more or less; according as they choose to make it; and as thick as two fingers. On one side; on the very edge; they make little holes; in which they make a notch. They put this bit of wood on some rotten wood or on some grass; dry and very fine; after taking care to crush it thoroughly in their hands. The other piece of wood is as thick as the little finger; it is a bit of a wood that has a black berry; which we call morette. When this wood is green it is very soft; and it is proportionately hard when it is dry. They shape the end to the size of the holes in the other piece of wood; into one of which they insert it; and by turning it in their hands without ceasing; they produce a sort of powder from which; after a very short time; one sees smoke issue; which shortly is converted into flame. This coming through the notch of which I have just spoken; falls on the rotten wood or dry grass; which is ignited"
Botanical Sources  
Thuja occidentalis L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Occurs in moist soils and swamps in eastern Miami lands
Related Sources  
Thuja occidentalis L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Great Lakes tribes; in general; used the sap squeezed from the ends of well-boiled cedar branches for the treatment of blood in the stool]