Species Detail

Umbilicaria dillenii
Lichen or Tripe du Roche


Scientific Name:  
Umbilicaria dillenii
Common Name:  
Lichen or Tripe du Roche
Myaamia Name:  
nipoopi minosakayi words listed sep in dict
Uses:  
Food
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Umbilicaria dillenii
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
No Reference Specified Use - Food  nipopi minosakayi
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  minosakai
Botanical Sources  
Umbilicaria dillenii
No sources entered.
Related Sources  
Umbilicaria dillenii
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Umbilicaria dillenii; called "tripe de roche" by Perrot; was eaten by the Algonquians that do not cultivate the ground; but are nomadic. "They consider themselves very fortunate in their hunting expeditions when they encounter some rabbits; martens; or partridges; from which to make a soup; and without what we call tripe de roche--which you would say is a species of gray moss; dry; and resembling oublies [wafers used to stick papers together]; and which of itself has only an earthy taste; and the flavor of the soup in which it is cooked--most of their families would perish of hunger"
No Reference Specified   "It is used for food only as a last resort; and Father Andre well says of it: "It is necessary to close ones eyes when one begins to eat it"
No Reference Specified   A flat-leafed lichen was eaten by the Ottawas. "When hunger is added to these discomforts [excessive heat and cold]; it is a severe hardship; but one that soon teaches a man to find a relish in the bitterest roots and the most putrid meat. We were forced to accustom ourselves to eat a certain moss growing upon the rocks. It is a sort of shell-shaped leaf which is always covered with catepillars and spiders; and which; on being boiled; furnishes an insipid soup; black and viscous; that rather serves to ward off death than to impart life"
No Reference Specified   Trippe de Roches also mentioned as a food source by Charlevoix; referring to wandering Indians of the midwest that do not cultivate the ground