Species Detail

Salvia apiana Jepson
White sage


Scientific Name:  
Salvia apiana Jepson
Common Name:  
White sage
Myaamia Name:  
none contemporary use only
Uses:  
Food, Medicinal, Customs
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Salvia apiana Jepson
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
No Reference Specified Customs  Used to smudge, with tobacco, drum and singers, graves during a funeral, and placed into grave.. According to Daryl Baldwin, white sage was not used historically, but sweet everlasting instead (email from Nov. 20, 2006 between MG and DB). – Michael Gonella
No Reference Specified Use - Customs/Medicinal  the chief smokes a sick person for healing. "the smoking ceremony we think it kind of purifies us . . . If youre sick or anything the chief will come out and smoke you which we feel like it helps you get well . . .we use to make the smoke is cedar and cedar is a cleanser . . green cedar to get more smoke; we use tobacco; tobacco is a purifier and then we use sage and its for medicinal [probably white sage; currently used by many tribes for similar purposes] . . . there was some sweetgrass mixed with the combination of sage and tobacco uh and the cedar"
No Reference Specified Use - Food  hung dry and possibly used for cooking
Botanical Sources  
Salvia apiana Jepson
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Native to arid and semi-arid areas of western U.S.
Related Sources  
Salvia apiana Jepson
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Only two plants; wild tobacco and red cedar; were used traditionally as ceremonial plants by the Miami. Contemporary uses of other plants in ceremonies; including white sage Salvia apiana; from western U.S. and sweetgrass Hierochloe odorata have been acquired often from the pan-Indian movement of modern times