Species Detail

Podophyllum peltatum L.
Mayapple


Scientific Name:  
Podophyllum peltatum L.
Common Name:  
Mayapple
Myaamia Name:  
kahkiteemiši
Uses:  
Food, Medicinal
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Podophyllum peltatum L.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
No Reference Specified Food  Fruit is edible when ripe, soft and yellow.
No Reference Specified Use - Food  fruit eaten [in summer]
No Reference Specified Use - Medicinal  the root was used [at an unknown season] as a "physic" or "purgative" . . . "they took the May apple root and pounded it up; and then soaked it out--it was always a liquid form; of course; when they used it." "May apple roots are still being used. There were still people who practiced herbal medicine [in his generation]"; although he or no one he knew ever used it. "We knew that the used it; because we sometimes gathered it; and sold the root to people who did used it."
No Reference Specified Use - Medicinal  Lyman Mongosa described preparing a liquid for a woman who was given up by doctors; in the early 1930s. His medicine; he felt; saved her . . and it may have been prepared from mayapple
No Reference Specified Use - Medicinal  root used for stomach disorders
No Reference Specified Use - Food  used as a snack food when in the woods
No Reference Specified Use - Food  fruits eaten raw or made into preserves
Botanical Sources  
Podophyllum peltatum L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Occurs in moist woods throughout eastern and western Miami lands
Related Sources  
Podophyllum peltatum L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Listed as a purgative and many other uses for the mayapple root
No Reference Specified   Listed on the U.S. Pharmacopeia as a drastic purgative
No Reference Specified   Dried rhizome and roots in small doses 0.3-1.0cc can be used to increase flow of bile; and is a slow but powerful cathartic; emetic; and can be poisonous in too large a dose. In large doses it can cause violent purging with profuse watery stools; hemorrhaging to internal organs and depression of central nervous system