Species Detail

Lagenaria siceraria Molina Standl.
Bottle Gourd


Scientific Name:  
Lagenaria siceraria Molina Standl.
Common Name:  
Bottle Gourd
Myaamia Name:  
šiihšiikwani
Uses:  
Medicinal, Customs, Technology
Harvest Seasons:  
Summer, Fall
Habitats:  
Human-Disturbed Areas
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Vine, Cultivated

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Lagenaria siceraria Molina Standl.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
Deliette, L. 1702 Use - Medicinal  ceremony to instill faith in healing powers of medicine man; uses chichicoya to wave while addressing village assembly;
Deliette, L. 1702 Use - Customs  pre-war singing with gourd rattle
Deliette, L. 1702 Use - Customs  honoring another nation.
Deliette, L. 1702 Use - Customs  pre-war singing.
Thwaites, R.G. (editor) 1903 Use - Food 
Baldwin, D 1997, August Use - Customs  tribal members often owned a small gourd and/or drum.
Blair, E 1912 Use - Customs  pre-war dancing; drumming and gourd rattling
Gatschet, A.S. ca. 1895 Use - Technology  used to make dipping utensil.
Anonymous 1837 Use - Customs  used for gourd rattles
N/A 1998-2006 Use - Customs  dried skins of fruits used to make rattles.
Gatschet, A.S. ca. 1895 Use - Technology  used to make dipping utensil.
N/A 1998-2006 Use - Customs  gourd rattles made for Gourd Dance
Charlevoix, P. 1923 Horticultural Info  Gourds; watermelons and sunflowers are first sprouted in a hot-bed; then transplanted into a crop field
Deliette, L. 1702 Use - Medicinal  gourd rattle of medicine men.
Botanical Sources  
Lagenaria siceraria Molina Standl.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Steyermark, J.A. 1963   Occurs as a cultivated species or an escape along roadsides; etc. throughout eastern and western Miami lands
Related Sources  
Lagenaria siceraria Molina Standl.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Bush, L. L 1996   Human-charred rind fragments, resembling the thin, hard walls of the bottle gourd, were recoverd from an early 19th century Miami village site at the forks of the Wabash River (Fort Wayne), 1975-1812 (Ehler Site).
Gleason, H.A. & Cronquist, A. 1991   The species name used here is listed as Lagenaria lagenaria in Smalls flora of the southeastern U.S.; and L. vulgaris or L. leucantha by Steyermark. There is no species with the common name of gourd in listed in Gleason and Cronquists flora -- the closest relative listed is Cucurbita foetidissima; wild pumpkin
Steyermark, J.A. 1963   Steyermark says this species is used for making drinking receptacles; utensils; decoration; and bird-houses; and that the small; young fruits may be cooked and eaten
Lamb, E.W; Shultz, L.W. 1964   Tea from any yellow flowered plant was used for aches and sluggishness
Kohn, R.W; Lynwood, M.R; Edmunds, D; Mannering, M.; 1997   The Delaware use rattles made of bell-gourds; although turtle shell rattles are still popular and in common use
Charlevoix, P. 1923   Great Lakes tribes; in general; used cupping-glasses made of gourds; and filled with combustible matters which they set on fire to treat some disease of the body
Blair, E 1911   Algonquians use a gourd rattle; filled with small pebbles; as part of a funeral custom.
Blair, E 1911   In the general Algonquian beliefs; the deceased travel to a beautiful country. In their travels there; after death; they arrive at a place where the drumbeat and gourd sounds mark time for the dead; gives them pleasure; and urges them on their way to the place of resting.