Species Detail

Ulmus rubra Muhl.
Slippery elm; or Red Elm; Piss elm


Scientific Name:  
Ulmus rubra Muhl.
Common Name:  
Slippery elm; or Red Elm; Piss elm
Myaamia Name:  
ašaahšikopa
Uses:  
Material, Customs
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Ulmus rubra Muhl.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
No Reference Specified Description  Scabrous leaves; inner bark of twigs red/rust colored; sightly fragrant and mucilaginous; facultative wetland species
No Reference Specified Habitat  Occurs in moist woods in eastern and western Miami lands
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  slippery or white elm; refering to the bark
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  used for something
No Reference Specified Use - Medicinal  a poultice of leaves made for rattlesnake bites
No Reference Specified Use - Technology  fishnet baskets were made for use at weirs in historic times. "Before the commerical nets they made a basket net; which was out of bark; mostly elm bark. It was the inner bark of the elm tree; the slippery elm tree; which was the red elm tree; and it was a type of net; more in the shape of a basket. Thats what they used at the weir"; and "Now you could be surprised what a thin net you can make out of elm bark. Elm bark; that was a basket maker; as well as hickory and white oak. But they made a real fine net out of elm bark . . . Ive heard the old people talk about it. It was flexible. The elm bark can be ripped down and pared down until its quite thin; its almost like a cloth; see; when they get through withit. And they wasnt as open as a woven net would be; but it was fairly so; enough that water would pass throughit; or whatever; see"
No Reference Specified Use - Technology  pigeon trap made from a wooden frame with bark nets
No Reference Specified Use - Technology  bark used to cover lodges; wigwams; houses. The word for roof is paxkwani; very similar
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  "cacikopa; slippery elm tree; i.e. slimy"
Botanical Sources  
Ulmus rubra Muhl.
No sources entered.
Related Sources  
Ulmus rubra Muhl.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Human-charred Slippery elm timbers were recovered from an excavation at an early 19th century Miami village site at the forks of the Wabash River (Ft Wayne), 1795-1812 (Ehler Site).
No Reference Specified   The Peoria of OK cut up the tender shoots of hackberry; elm and poplar for cattle fodder
No Reference Specified   Fibers used to make woven fabrics by the Hopewell
No Reference Specified   An ancient fishing weir dam still exists on the Wabash River; northeast of Peru; Indiana and was and is known to most Miami fishermen. Lamoine Marks was told about it when he was a boy; by his father Charlie; and last saw it while fishing in winter in 1953. Rafert and Marks rediscovered it in July, 1988. This weir dam is described in Outdoor Indiana; July/August 1989
No Reference Specified   The Miami term "pakkokwaniji" refers to the common upland elm and "pakkokwaninji sipiomakwi" to the water elm