Species Detail

Quercus alba L.
White oak tree


Scientific Name:  
Quercus alba L.
Common Name:  
White oak tree
Myaamia Name:  
waapinkwaahkatwi
Uses:  
Medicinal, Material
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Quercus alba L.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
No Reference Specified Use - Medicinal  the bark was soaked in water then used on burns
No Reference Specified Use - Medicinal  leaves; bark or root was boiled and used on wounds. "The bark or the root of the white oak boiled for wounds; The leaf of the same wood is also perfectly good"
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  "wawapingakatwi; white oak tree" "There are 3 variants for 'white oak'; waawiipinkwaahkatwi is by far the most common but waawaapinkwaahkatwi might have been more specifically the Miami dialect form. This boils down to a judgement call." (Email sent from David Costa to Kara Strass, October 2018). –
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  "wawiyipinggotwi; oak"
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  "waupingwauhkautaa; white oak"
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  "kaaoohkungk nonee weepingwauhkart; it has blown down that white oak"
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  "wewipingwakki; white oak"; weepinkwaahki
No Reference Specified Use - Material  used in construction. Human-charred white oak timbers were recovered from an early 19th century Miami village site at the forks of the Wabash River
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  "8a8iping8kat8i"; white oak
No Reference Specified Horticultural Info  Oak and hickory nuts are available in the Fall; and have irregular peak mast harvest; separated by a range of 1-4 years. This means that oak and hickory peak masts are irregular; but variation in yields in consistent from year to year; thus enabling Native Americans to plan for taking advantage of peak masts. The largest masts occur when tree crowns are exposed to maximum sun--Native Americans could also have easily thinned trees to increase size and production of remaining trees
Botanical Sources  
Quercus alba L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Occurs in upland woods
Related Sources  
Quercus alba L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Talalay; Keller and Munson. 1984. Hickory nuts
No Reference Specified   The Miami-Illinois term for vase of acorn; or nut; is alakaya
No Reference Specified   "The Oak is so good; that I believe it exceeds ours for building Ships." --this probably referred to the fact that the oaks encountered were so much larger than those of the British Isles; and were thought to be superior if used for building ships from them like the British were used to doing