Species Detail

Polygala senega L. unconfirmed
Snakeroot


Scientific Name:  
Polygala senega L. unconfirmed
Common Name:  
Snakeroot
Myaamia Name:  
No Myaamia Name
Uses:  
Undetermined
Harvest Seasons:  
Unkn
Habitats:  
Beech-Maple Forest, Oak Forest including Oak-Hickory, Beech-Oak-Maple Mixed Mesophytic
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Herb, Wild

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Polygala senega L. unconfirmed
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
Gleason, H.A. & Cronquist, A. 1991 Description  Polygala senega has dense racemes with white flowers
Thwaites, R.G. (editor) 1966 Use - Medicinal  used to cure snakebites. According to Kenton 1925; this species or Aristolochia serpentaria could possibly be the one referred to by Marquette; in his 1674 letter in the Jesuit Relations
Botanical Sources  
Polygala senega L. unconfirmed
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Gleason, H.A. & Cronquist, A. 1991   Occurs in rocky soils; widely distributed across eastern U.S. west to AR
Coulter, S 1899   Occurs in rocky; shaded soils throughout IN not found within western Miami lands; –
Related Sources  
Polygala senega L. unconfirmed
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Probably not either of these species; since they are out of the range of both eastern and western Miami lands
Moerman, Daniel E 1998   used medicinally by numerous tribes; from the Cherokee to the Ojibway; Cree; and Woodlands; mostly for its cathartic and expectorant properties--roots commonly chewed for sore throats
Coulter, S 1932   Dried roots contain saponins which irritate the stomach and intestines and increase bronchial secretions. In large doses 1 gm acts as an emetic and cathartic; and in smaller doses it is an expectorant; sialagogic; diaphoretic; diuretic; and emmenagogic. Chiefly used as an expectorant