Species Detail

Ceanothus spp. unconfirmed
redroot


Scientific Name:  
Ceanothus spp. unconfirmed
Common Name:  
redroot
Myaamia Name:  
neehpikiciikaahkwi
Uses:  
Medicinal, Customs
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Dry Prairie grasslands
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Shrub

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Ceanothus spp. unconfirmed
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
No Reference Specified Description  a small bush; similar to the huckleberry; which grows on the prairies and has a short; thick; red root
No Reference Specified Use - Medicinal  thick red root made into tea for curing
No Reference Specified Use - Customs  a traditional story recounts some Peorias that wanted to scare off a white family looking for a house to lease. "Before the time for their [the white family] return he gathered up turkey feathers and made a large head-dress; smeared his face with red paint from redroot and some yellow clay; dressed himself in some old beaded clothing and; armed with a huge tomahawk; waited for them by the side of the road; concealed in some bushes. When they were even with him he sprang to the road with a wild yell; brandishing his tomahawk. The family left as fast as their horses would travel and never returned and Uncle John never tired of laughing over his "Wild Indian Stunt."
Botanical Sources  
Ceanothus spp. unconfirmed
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Ceanothus americanus; sometimes called New Jersey tea; or redroot; or C. herbaceus; called Prairie redroot were probably both indicated by neehpikiccikaahkwi; both growing in prairies through Indiana and Oklahoma
Related Sources  
Ceanothus spp. unconfirmed
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   a tea was made from the leaves during the American Revolution. No caffeine is found in the leaves; but the root was once used as an expectorant and astringent; and the root bark has been found to have many blood-clotting properties.