Species Detail

Thuja occidentalis L.
Northern white cedar


Scientific Name:  
Thuja occidentalis L.
Common Name:  
Northern white cedar
Myaamia Name:  
Uses:  
Technology
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Thuja occidentalis L.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
Small, J.K. 1903 Description  Two species were commonly called white cedar; according to Small; including Thuja occidentalis; and Chamaecyparis thoides; also known as cypress; but is found predominately on the coastal plain
Pease, Theodore Calvin and Raymond C. Werner 1934 Use - Technology  used as a baseboard when hand-starting fires. "One of the pieces of wood which they use to make a fire is of white cedar; which is the most combustible; a foot long more or less; according as they choose to make it; and as thick as two fingers. On one side; on the very edge; they make little holes; in which they make a notch. They put this bit of wood on some rotten wood or on some grass; dry and very fine; after taking care to crush it thoroughly in their hands. The other piece of wood is as thick as the little finger; it is a bit of a wood that has a black berry; which we call morette. When this wood is green it is very soft; and it is proportionately hard when it is dry. They shape the end to the size of the holes in the other piece of wood; into one of which they insert it; and by turning it in their hands without ceasing; they produce a sort of powder from which; after a very short time; one sees smoke issue; which shortly is converted into flame. This coming through the notch of which I have just spoken; falls on the rotten wood or dry grass; which is ignited"
Botanical Sources  
Thuja occidentalis L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Gleason, H.A. & Cronquist, A. 1991   Occurs in moist soils and swamps in eastern Miami lands
Related Sources  
Thuja occidentalis L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Kellogg, L.P. 1923   Great Lakes tribes; in general; used the sap squeezed from the ends of well-boiled cedar branches for the treatment of blood in the stool]