Species Detail

Ipomoea pandurata L. G.F.W. Mey. rel. ref.
Wild potato; Man-of-the-Earth


Scientific Name:  
Ipomoea pandurata L. G.F.W. Mey. rel. ref.
Common Name:  
Wild potato; Man-of-the-Earth
Myaamia Name:  
kiinwaahkoosia
Uses:  
Food
Harvest Seasons:  
Winter, Summer, Spring
Habitats:  
Dry Prairie grasslands, Wet Prairie grasslands with flooding, Conifer Shrubland and Forest, Deciduous Swamp no coniferous domts.
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Herb, Cultivated, Wild

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Ipomoea pandurata L. G.F.W. Mey. rel. ref.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
Dunn, J.P. 1919 Use - Food  tubers eaten. [Perrots "Indian potatoes" probably refers to this species or Jerusalem artichoke]
Throwbridge, C.C 1938 Use - Food  gathered in wet prairies and eaten. "paneekee; wild potato; these are found in abundance in the wet prairies throughout the country and are gathered in hoeing time June. They are easily boiled and when they wish to change the color the Indians throw a few leaves of the soft maple [into the cooking kettle] which turns them black"
Throwbridge, C.C 1938 Use - Food  waupeeseepina is the white potato; found growing in low prairies and the potatoe portion similar in appearance and taste to the commericial potato of the times ca. 1938. Easily cooked and very good tasting; these roots are used much by the Miami; particularly when food is seasonally scarce.
Gatschet, A.S. ca. 1895 Use - Food  wild potatoes are gathered in prairies; cooked and eaten. "pana; pena . . . Refers to one or more species of onion-like or turnip-shaped nutritious bulbs growing extensively upon the western prairies. This "pomme blanche" as named by the "coureurs des bois" look dark and are sweeter than our Irish potatoes. They cook in six hours and are usually called by these Indians [the Miami] nalauxki panaki"
Gatschet, A.S. ca. 1895 Use - Food  the archaic term for this [sweet potato] fruit is kinwa kussia; pl. kinwaki kussiaki "long potato." The archaic term is still used by many people
Gatschet, A.S. ca. 1895 Use - Food  kenkanwa kuthiaki sweet potatoes; archaic for batates; now kussia
Gatschet, A.S. ca. 1895 Use - Food  paxkussia; kussia /-aki pl. sweet potato; better called batate. The archaic name given to this fruit is kinwa kussia long fruit
Gravier, J. ca. 1700 Horticultural Info  nimic8ah8aki = "I found some roots; potatoes; for example digging with a stick etc."
Botanical Sources  
Ipomoea pandurata L. G.F.W. Mey. rel. ref.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Gleason, H.A. & Cronquist, A. 1991   Ipomaea pandurata: dry woods and thickets; Helianthus tuberosus: moist soils and waste places
Related Sources  
Ipomoea pandurata L. G.F.W. Mey. rel. ref.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Kerr, J. 1935   The Miami-Illinois term "panick" means potatoes; "paniki axki" means potato field and "ahpeniikiinsa" means little potatoes. Ts [000] recorded the term "paanarkee" as indicating potato in Miami-Illinois
Gonella, M.P. 2003-2005   The Miami term "ahpena" means the cultivated; domesticated garden potato; Solanum tuberosum in contemporary times; but originally used for another edible tuber
Gonella, M.P. 2003-2005   According to the University of Michigan at Dearborn; Native American Ethnobotany Database Moerman; Ipomoea pandurata is widely used by indigenous groups across North America; with most uses being medicinal; and only two records; one by the Cherokee; as a food/starvation food source. This species is the best guess at what was harvested in the summer not oonsaapeekatiki; since this is a fall/winter/early spring harvest and considered ahpena