Species Detail

Prunus americana Marshall.
Wild plum tree


Scientific Name:  
Prunus americana Marshall.
Common Name:  
Wild plum tree
Myaamia Name:  
ateehseemiĆĄaahkwa
Uses:  
Food, Material
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Prunus americana Marshall.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  tafumeneke
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  plums
No Reference Specified Use - Food  "Wild plums were here; theyve always been here. . . .My mother even made jelly out of em. But the old people ate them just right off the tree ripe. Theyre quite good."
No Reference Specified Use - Food  plums gathered and preserved. "The savages gather quantities of wild plums and grapes . . . "
No Reference Specified Use - Food  made into plum wine. Jim Strack knew a lady that worked at a beauty shop near him that made wine out of wild plumbs. This woman told his wife; Mary Ellen; how to make it; calling it "plumb dumb" wine. "You could get plum dumb on it real easy!" The fruits were first collected; mashed and sugar put over them. Then water was added until it covered them mashed plums and the mixture was refrigerated. In a short while it became quite strong
No Reference Specified Use - Material  game played with plum stones like those in picture. "Sansawingee" means bowls; which is the name of the game. A wooden bowl and six plum stones; painted black on one side; white on the other. The player scores if he turns up five of the same color; after tossing. "This counts him half of the amount bet; and six of the same color wins it." Betting is often involved
No Reference Specified Use - Material  plum stone game played at Miami Tribe of Okalahomas language camps
No Reference Specified Use - Food  traditional food. In the traditional story of Young Thunder William Pecongah; he describes the crops he had growing on his land 160 acres of reserve in central Indiana. "There I planted corn; wheat; potatoes; peas; tobacco; beans; apple trees; pumpkins; watermelons; cucumbers; onions; hay; straw; gooseberries; raspberries; blackberries; currants; turnips; tomatoes; pawpaws; cherries; strawberries; plums; blackhaws; peaches; walnut trees; pecans; hickory nuts; barley and rye."
No Reference Specified Use - Material  There is a set of Miami dice made from fruit pits possibly wild plum housed at the National Museum of the American Indian; Washington D.C.
No Reference Specified Use - Food  white plums eaten. "We therefore landed; and entered their Cabins; where they offered us meat from wild cattle and bears grease; with white plums; which are very good"
No Reference Specified Use - Food/Material  "tassaminia; plum"
No Reference Specified Use - Food/Material  "tasaminic; peaches"
No Reference Specified Use - Food/Material  "atassamina" for plum
No Reference Specified Use - Food 
No Reference Specified Use - Food  pitted; cooked and eaten. "theyre tart; so add extra sugar"
No Reference Specified Horticultural Info  For harvesting fruits; put down a tablecloth first and shake the tree
No Reference Specified Ecological Info  "There arent as many of these [wild plums] as their used to be--due to loss of fencerows"
Botanical Sources  
Prunus americana Marshall.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   They grow best "In fence rows and the the edge of clearings"; not along the river; but on higher; well-drained areas
No Reference Specified   Occurs in moist woods; roadsides and fencerows
Related Sources  
Prunus americana Marshall.
No sources entered.