Species Detail

Prunus serotina Ehrh.
Wild cherry tree


Scientific Name:  
Prunus serotina Ehrh.
Common Name:  
Wild cherry tree
Myaamia Name:  
mahkwawilamiĊĦi
Uses:  
Medicinal
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Prunus serotina Ehrh.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown 
No Reference Specified Use - Medicinal  the bark of the root chewed and held a long time on the gums to cure an infection. "Also; the bark of the root of the cherry tree chewed and held for a long time on the gums cures the falling sickness"
No Reference Specified Use - Medicinal  inner bark from the west side of tree boiled and made into tea for cough syrup
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown 
No Reference Specified Use - Medicinal  bark used as a tonic and cough syrup
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  leaves used
No Reference Specified Use - Medicinal  bark crushed or chewed used to treat wounds. "The bark of wild cherry in cluster; chewed or crushed for wounds"
No Reference Specified Use - Medicinal  tea made by boiling "spicnert"; horehound; comfrey; cherry bark and "alicompain"[spelling may not be accurate]
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  "cacityouqui; cherry tree"
No Reference Specified Use - Medicinal  fruit eaten as a laxative; "sharp taste but good laxative . . .dont eat too many!"
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown 
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown  "mugalomere; cherry tree" and "nupekecuqu; cherry tree"
Botanical Sources  
Prunus serotina Ehrh.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Occurs in woods; along streams and abundant in roadsides and forest margins
Related Sources  
Prunus serotina Ehrh.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   The Miami word neehpikicaahkwa was also recorded by Dunn for the cherry tree; with no use mentioned
No Reference Specified   neehpikicaahkwa and katoohwakimisaahkwi may refer to any of the other native cherry species in the Prunus genus; including; choke-cherry Prunus virginiana; sand-cherry Prunus pumila; and wild red cherry Prunus pensylvanica; but Prunus serotina was the most common of these species in western Coulter 1899; Small 1903; Steyermark 1963:distribution maps of Missouri counties and eastern Miami territories
No Reference Specified   The wood is reddish-brown; and resembles mahoghany; used for furniture; tool handles; musical instruments; the bark is bitter and aromatic and is used for its astringent properties in cough medicines; expectorants and sore throats; the fruit is edible.
No Reference Specified   Shawnee collected this plant
No Reference Specified   Dried stem bark collected in autumn; in small doses 2 gm acts as an astringent; tonic and sedative--and is used in cough syrups. Prussic acid is present in the bark; but normally in too small amounts to give the sedative effects
No Reference Specified   Human-charred Prunus spp. material recovered from excavations at an early 19th century Miami village site
No Reference Specified   It is unclear whether this word indicates a native cherry or cultivated cherry or both. There are four edible native cherries. The two native cherries; P. serotina wild black cherry, 1cm thick black fruits; P. virginiana choke-cherry with 8-10cm thick black fruits occur in a variety of habitats; the former abundant as a roadside tree; throughout eastern Miami lands; and the other two natives; P. pumila sand-cherry with 1-1.5cm thick black fruits and P. pensylvanica pin-cherry; with 6mm thick red fruits; occur in a variety of habitats in both eastern and western Miami lands. There are five introduced cherries; P. padus European bird-cherry with 6-8mm thick black; inedible fruits; P. mahaleb Mahaleb-cherry with 6mm thick dark red to black; bitter fruits; P. avium sweet-cherry with 1.5-2.5cm thick fruit; P. cerasus sour cherry or pie-cherry with 1.5-2cm thick tart; red fruit; and P. fruticosa ground-cherry with 1cm thick; dark red fruits occur in a variety of habitats as cultivated cherries and escapes within eastern and western Miami lands