Species Detail

Urtica dioica L. and/or U. chamaedryoides Pursh.
Stinging nettle


Scientific Name:  
Urtica dioica L. and/or U. chamaedryoides Pursh.
Common Name:  
Stinging nettle
Myaamia Name:  
aašoošiwia species of nettle
Uses:  
Material, Technology
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Urtica dioica L. and/or U. chamaedryoides Pursh.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
No Reference Specified Description  Urtica dioica is a much larger; perennial nettle than U. chamaedryoides; an annual
No Reference Specified Description  "a week; the leaves of which produce a burning or sitching sap; and hence regarded as poisonous; no flowers; stalk about one foot"
No Reference Specified Use - Technology  cordage for fishing nets made from nettles and wild hemp. The women gather; spin and twist lengths of cordage on their bare thighs. The cords used to draw these nets are made of the bark of basswood or leather. With these nets many fish and beaver are captured. They also fish with still lines up to 90 meters long [possibly of the same cordage material]
No Reference Specified Use - Material  cordage. "Before their knowledge of the whites they used belts made of the small bones found in the legs of swans and other large birds; which were attached by means of a cord composed of the fibres of the wild nettle. These were made with much labour; and were said to be admirably wrought. They soon exchanged them however for the wampum . . ."
No Reference Specified Use - Material  cordage fiber attaching history belts
No Reference Specified Use - Material  there are Miami items made of hemp; possibly dogbane or nettles; including a sack; medicine pouch and necklace cordage; all housed at the National Museum of the American Indian; in Washington D.C.
No Reference Specified Use - Material  there are 2 items that are possibly made with plant fibers; which could include dogbane; nettles or basswood; among others; at the Cranbrook Institute in Michigan
Botanical Sources  
Urtica dioica L. and/or U. chamaedryoides Pursh.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Found in many habitats throughout eastern and western Miami lands
Related Sources  
Urtica dioica L. and/or U. chamaedryoides Pursh.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   One of the most important sources of fibers for Eastern North American Indians; where the plant tissues were almost always treated before fiber use. Many tribes simply peeled the bark from the plant and twisted it. Museum artifacts made with nettle fibers include a Delaware wampum string and burden strap; Micmac cordage to hold a knife blade to its handle; an Ojibway bow string; twelve Hopewell specimens; and other uses by Ohio cave and rock-shelter dwellers
No Reference Specified   Documented as used by local Indians in the Kentucky area; the Shawnee; in a letter from Col. Nathan Boone; son of Daniel Boone; to Dr. Lyman Draper: "Used to gather nettles; a sort of hemp; towards spring when it became rotted by the wet weather; and spin them; very strong--in rich lands grows four feet high: nettles the warp; and buffalo wool spun the filling--both spun. For socks buffalo wool alone was used--quite soft and wears very well."
No Reference Specified   Algonquians play a game called crosse; played with a wooden ball and racket with a netted end; like a tennis racket. "There is among them a certain game; called crosse; which has much likenes to our game of long tennis . . . You will see them all equipped with the crosse--which is a light club; having at one end a broad flat part that is netted like a racket [possibly dogbane; basswood; nettles; or another strong fiber"
No Reference Specified   La Salle was one of the first to note the name of a tributary to the upper portion of Illinois River; called masaana [rope] siipiiwi; which is the present day Kankakee River; so named for the surrounding land present day Mazon; McCafferty 2004; pers. Comm. where he noted a great quantity of hemp growing; possibly referring to fiber-producing plants like the nettle
No Reference Specified   Gravier provided the term "waapahsapiiki" as plural for hemp cord; "espece de chamvre dont on fait des cordes asses blanches" Pinet says "corde dorties"