Species Detail

Planera aquatica Walter J.F. Gremlin
Water elm


Scientific Name:  
Planera aquatica Walter J.F. Gremlin
Common Name:  
Water elm
Myaamia Name:  
pakhkokwaninci siipiiomeekwi
Uses:  
Material, Technology
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Planera aquatica Walter J.F. Gremlin
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
Dunn, J.P. 1919 Use - Material/Technology  canoe; tables for drying corn; berries; and fruit. "If they wanted canoes lighter than dug-outs; they made them of the bark of the water-elm or hickory; the pig-nut hickory being considered best. They cut down a tree; peeled off the bark with flat sticks. In the spring; when the trees were beginning to leave; the bark came off easily; and at other times they had to pound it to loosen it. This kind also used for tables for drying corn; berries; fruits; etc. Laid poles placed on forked sticks. Also used for sugar troughs--bend ends up and fasten them. When through would soak and straighten them out and lay them up like shingles when dry to use next year. Would serve for several years. Also made boxes of it"
Dunn, J.P. Circa 1900 Use - Unknown  "pakkokwaninji sipiomakwi"; water elm
Dunn, J.P. Circa 1900 Related Info  "tributary of the Maumee [River] was named "Marais de l'orme." (Elm Swamp)"
Botanical Sources  
Planera aquatica Walter J.F. Gremlin
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Gleason, H.A. & Cronquist, A. 1991   Occurs in swamps and low; wet woodlands of western and the southernmost portions of eastern Miami Illinois lands; covering the coastal plain north to southern Illinois; portions of southeastern Oklahoma
Related Sources  
Planera aquatica Walter J.F. Gremlin
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Burns, N.L. 2003   The Peoria of OK cut up the tender shoots of hackberry; elm and poplar for cattle fodder
Bush, L. L 1996   Human-charred American elm timbers were recovered from an early 19th century Miami village site at the forks of the Wabash River