Species Detail

Quercus alba L.
White oak tree


Scientific Name:  
Quercus alba L.
Common Name:  
White oak tree
Myaamia Name:  
waapinkwaahkatwi
Uses:  
Medicinal, Material
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Quercus alba L.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
Lamb, E.W; Shultz, L.W. 1964 Use - Medicinal  the bark was soaked in water then used on burns
Anonymous 1724 Use - Medicinal  leaves; bark or root was boiled and used on wounds. "The bark or the root of the white oak boiled for wounds; The leaf of the same wood is also perfectly good"
Dunn, J.P. Circa 1900 Use - Unknown  "wawapingakatwi; white oak tree" "There are 3 variants for 'white oak'; waawiipinkwaahkatwi is by far the most common but waawaapinkwaahkatwi might have been more specifically the Miami dialect form. This boils down to a judgement call." (Email sent from David Costa to Kara Strass, October 2018). –
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown 
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown 
No Reference Specified Use - Unknown 
Gatschet, A.S. ca. 1895 Use - Unknown  "wewipingwakki; white oak"; weepinkwaahki
Bush, L. L 1996 Use - Material  used in construction. Human-charred white oak timbers were recovered from an early 19th century Miami village site at the forks of the Wabash River
Pinet, P.F. 1696-circa 1700 Use - Unknown  "8a8iping8kat8i"; white oak
Gardener, P.S. 1997 Horticultural Info  Oak and hickory nuts are available in the Fall; and have irregular peak mast harvest; separated by a range of 1-4 years. This means that oak and hickory peak masts are irregular; but variation in yields in consistent from year to year; thus enabling Native Americans to plan for taking advantage of peak masts. The largest masts occur when tree crowns are exposed to maximum sun--Native Americans could also have easily thinned trees to increase size and production of remaining trees
Botanical Sources  
Quercus alba L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Gleason, H.A. & Cronquist, A. 1991   Occurs in upland woods
Related Sources  
Quercus alba L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
No Reference Specified   Talalay; Keller and Munson. 1984. Hickory nuts
Gatschet, A.S. ca. 1895   The Miami-Illinois term for vase of acorn; or nut; is alakaya
Thwaites, R.G. (editor) 1903   "The Oak is so good; that I believe it exceeds ours for building Ships." --this probably referred to the fact that the oaks encountered were so much larger than those of the British Isles; and were thought to be superior if used for building ships from them like the British were used to doing