Species Detail

Ribes sp. L.
Currant


Scientific Name:  
Ribes sp. L.
Common Name:  
Currant
Myaamia Name:  
Uses:  
Food
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Ribes sp. L.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
Gatschet, A.S. ca. 1895 Description  Bunches are not as large as common grapes
Gatschet, A.S. ca. 1895 Use - Food  traditional food. In the traditional story of Young Thunder William Pecongah; he describes the crops he had growing on his land 160 acres of reserve in central Indiana. "There I planted corn; wheat; potatoes; peas; tobacco; beans; apple trees; pumpkins; watermelons; cucumbers; onions; hay; straw; gooseberries; raspberries; blackberries; currants; turnips; tomatoes; pawpaws; cherries; strawberries; plums; blackhaws; peaches; walnut trees; pecans; hickory nuts; barley and rye."
Dunn, J.P. Circa 1900 Use - Unknown  "asandapakwi"
Dunn, J.P. Circa 1900 Use - Unknown  eehsipanimini
Botanical Sources  
Ribes sp. L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Gleason, H.A. & Cronquist, A. 1991   There are six native currant species. Five of these species Spiny swamp-currant; R. lacustre; Skunk-currant; R. glandulosum; Western black currant; R. hudsonianum; Eastern black currant; R. americanum; Swamp red currant; R. triste occur in wet areas including swamps; bogs; woods in the eastern Miami lands. A sixth native species Buffalo-currant; R. odoratum occurs on rocky cliffs and hillsides predominately in western Miami lands. Two exotic currants Garden black currant; R. nigrum; Garden red currant; R. sativum occur as escapes from areas where cultivated throughout eastern and western Miami lands.;
Related Sources  
Ribes sp. L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Dunn, J.P. Circa 1900   Racoon grapes; or coon grapes used a similar Miami-Illinois term to Dunns word for currant; "esepanimini"
Gatschet, A.S. ca. 1895   These grapes are described as "assipana ssandepakwi; racoon grapes; a sour grape relished by racoons but not eaten by people; the bunches not solarge as of common grapes; it is preferable to call this grape assipanimina