Species Detail

Rubus allegheniensis T.C. Porter
Common blackberry


Scientific Name:  
Rubus allegheniensis T.C. Porter
Common Name:  
Common blackberry
Myaamia Name:  
makiinkweemina
Uses:  
Food, Medicinal
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Rubus allegheniensis T.C. Porter
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
Tippman, D. 1999, November 11 Use - Food  wild blackberries picked
Gatschet, A.S. ca. 1895 Use - Food  traditional food. In the traditional story of Young Thunder William Pecongah; he describes the crops he had growing on his land 160 acres of reserve in central Indiana.
Gravier, J. ca. 1700 Use - Unknown 
Kerr, J. 1935 Use - Unknown 
Kerr, J. 1935 Use - Unknown 
Dunn, J.P. Circa 1900 Use - Unknown 
Anonymous 1837 Use - Unknown 
Rafert, S. 1989, August 24-25 Use - Food  fruits eaten
McCord, P. (Geboe) 2004, June 5 Use - Food  used for jelly by her grandmother Geboe
No Reference Specified Use - Food  gathered early in the morning
Olds, Julie, Olds, Dustin and Dani Tippman 1999 Use - Medicinal  root used to treat diarrhea
Botanical Sources  
Rubus allegheniensis T.C. Porter
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Gleason, H.A. & Cronquist, A. 1991   Occurs on mostly in disturbed areas throughout eastern Miami lands; with closely related or hybrids occuring in western Miami lands
Related Sources  
Rubus allegheniensis T.C. Porter
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Gleason, H.A. & Cronquist, A. 1991   Rubus taxonomy is complex; confused by hyrbridization; polyploidy and apomixis; and the group of blackberry species is even less clear. According to Coulter; Small; Steyermark and Gleason and Cronquist; it is reasonable to assume that the Miami word for blackberry referred to either R. allegheniensis; which was and is very common; or one of less common species including R. orarius; R. argustus; R. canadensis; R. pensilvanicus or R. setosus; all closley resembling R. allegheniensis
Clark, J.E. 1993   Shawnee collected this plant
N/A 1998-2006   Barbara Mullin recipe used by Senecas and Quapaws and possibly other tribes used blackberries or blueberries and cornmeal to make a traditional; southern style cornbread
Dunn, J.P. Circa 1900   Archaeological studies have demonstrated that blackberries were utilized as a food resource by Late Woodland 800 A.D to 1450 A.D. indigenous peoples of central and southern Indiana
Bush, L. L 1996   Due to lead; cadmium and zinc contamination in the Tar Creek Superfund Sites watershed; around Miami; Oklahoma and the Miami Tribe of Oklahomas headquarters; Miami and other local tribal members worry that traditional gathering of food; medicine and other items may be contaminated. Fish; wild blackberries; sassafras; pokeweed; basket-making supplies and wild onions could have high concentrations of lead; as do the waters of nearby lakes; and it is not always successful keeping tribal members out of these areas. The Seneca-Cayugas berry dance could not be held; if all the wild blackberries and strawberries in the area are found to be contaminated
No Reference Specified   Corn and blackberries were used in a traditional Native American southern style cornbread