Species Detail

Sambucus canadensis L. or S. racemosa L.
Common elderberry or Red berried elderberry


Scientific Name:  
Sambucus canadensis L. or S. racemosa L.
Common Name:  
Common elderberry or Red berried elderberry
Myaamia Name:  
wiikooloomphsa
Uses:  
Food, Material, Technology
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Sambucus canadensis L. or S. racemosa L.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
Dunn, J.P. Circa 1900 Use - Unknown  "wikullumpsa"; or wiikooloomphsa; "elder bush"
Olds, Julie, Olds, Dustin and Dani Tippman 1999 Use - Food  berries gathered and made into juice
Tippman, D. 1999, November 11 Use - Food  berries gathered for making into preserves; sometimes mixed with something else to make more tart
Tippman, D. 1999, November 11 Use - Material  stems hollowed out using a willow branch; then a whittled down hickory stick placed inside along with a paper wad to make a pop-gun
Gatschet, A.S. ca. 1895 Use - Unknown  "papikwanze; papikweze; elder-tree; probably Sambucus glauca. SW [Sarah Wadsworth] thinks the pit in it named the tree papikwanshi-wanshi is pith or marrow"
Strack, M. 2004, February 27 Use - Food  berries made into jelly; flower buds and heads can be deep fried and eaten
Strack, M. 2004, February 27 Use - Technology  stem hollowed out and used as a tap for maple sugaring
Dorin, G, Sr. 2004, August 10 Use - Food  wild elderberries picked and eaten as a child. Mother; Thelma Louise Baker of the Eagle Band; made elderberry wine and jelly
Botanical Sources  
Sambucus canadensis L. or S. racemosa L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Gleason, H.A. & Cronquist, A. 1991   S. canadensis occurs in moist or rich woods; fields; and roadsides in eastern and western Miami lands; while S. racemosa occurs in rich woods in only eastern Miami territory
Related Sources  
Sambucus canadensis L. or S. racemosa L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Coulter, S 1932   Flowers of Sambucus canadensis or S. nigra contain volatile oils; resins and other compounds that when given in small doses 4 gm act as a diaphoretic; diuretic; and stimulant; and are used to treat erysipelas; and fevers
No Reference Specified   An undetermined source listed