Species Detail

Scirpus validus Vahl.
Softstem bullrush


Scientific Name:  
Scirpus validus Vahl.
Common Name:  
Softstem bullrush
Myaamia Name:  
alaansooni
Uses:  
Material, Customs
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Scirpus validus Vahl.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
Gatschet, A.S. ca. 1895 Use - Material  long mats or smaller mats; to be used as bed mats; approximately the size of settlers beds circa 1895. When to be used as a bed mat; it is our size of beds and laid on the ground
Dunn, J.P. Circa 1900 Use - Material  bed mat that is the length and width of settlers beds circa 1909; and is laid bare on the ground
Pease, Theodore Calvin and Raymond C. Werner 1934 Use - Material  mats made from rushes.
Throwbridge, C.C 1938 Use - Customs  rush mat used for dancing upon during peace-making ceremony
Throwbridge, C.C 1938 Use - Material  women are in charge of making the mats
Pease, Theodore Calvin and Raymond C. Werner 1934 Use - Customs  pre-war singing.
Pease, Theodore Calvin and Raymond C. Werner 1934 Use - Material  mat made of softstem bullrush used as a bundle for carrying herbal medicines to cure those wounded in war.
Pease, Theodore Calvin and Raymond C. Werner 1934 Use - Customs  they sit on their mats during a healing ceremony; put on by the medicine men and women; to instill belief in their powers among the young
Pease, Theodore Calvin and Raymond C. Werner 1934 Use - Material  finely woven mats made.
Thwaites, R.G. (editor) 1903 Use - Material  during the summer months of cultivation; April through October; permanent villages were inhabited; and during this time women gathered wild foods and mat materials as well
No Reference Specified Use - Material  coverings and floorings for dwellings.
Thwaites, R.G. (editor) 1966 Use - Material  Guests are given their finest mats on which to rest.
Blair, E 1911 Use - Customs  used for making long mats.
Gatschet, A.S. ca. 1895 Use - Material  The Peorias made a long mat; lasuni; from scirpus growing in these parts. One of these is a flat scirpus [probably cattail]; pakwayaki
Dunn, J.P. Circa 1900 Use - Material 
Pease, Theodore Calvin and Raymond C. Werner 1934 Horticultural Info  The word mizanikani means fabric; straw; or any other rushes Scirpus spp. that were used for the purposes listed
Botanical Sources  
Scirpus validus Vahl.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Gleason, H.A. & Cronquist, A. 1991   Occurs in marshes and muddy shores of lakes and streams; tolerant of alkalai
Pease, Theodore Calvin and Raymond C. Werner 1934   Occurs in marshes
Related Sources  
Scirpus validus Vahl.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Gonella, M.P. 2003-2005   There is a coiled basket that is possibly made of softstem bullrush; housed at the National Museum of the American Indian; in Washington D.C.
No Reference Specified   Algonquian women; in general; made the mats for roofing or flooring of dwellings. They also carried these mats when they traveled by foot.
Blair, E 1911   Upon the death of a mans brother Algonquians; neighbors to the surviving brother offer the deceased two gifts in order to remove the tears of his relatives; a mat to lie on and a piece of bark to shelter the corpse from the weather.
Blair, E 1911   The Miami-Illinois term