Species Detail

Vaccinium sp. L.
Blueberry


Scientific Name:  
Vaccinium sp. L.
Common Name:  
Blueberry
Myaamia Name:  
wiipinkwamini
Uses:  
Food
Harvest Seasons:  
Undetermined
Habitats:  
Undetermined
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Undetermined

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Vaccinium sp. L.
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
Gonella, M.P. 2003-2005 Description  The blueberries referenced by Kenton could be any number of species; including V. angustifolium common lowbush-blueberry; V. pallidum hillside-blueberry; V. myrtilloides velvetleaf blueberry; V. corymbosum highbush-blueberry; and V. stamineum Squaw huckleberry; according to blueberry species listed in Coulter 1899 and using nomenclature from Gleason and Cronquist 1991
Kenton, E 1925 Use - Food  blueberries brought to missionaries for eating
Dunn, J.P. Circa 1900 Use - Food 
Dorin, G, Sr. 2004, August 10 Use - Food  wild blueberries picked and eaten while growing up
Botanical Sources  
Vaccinium sp. L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Gleason, H.A. & Cronquist, A. 1991   All possible species occur in dry uplands soils; and all but V. stamineum occur in moist or swamp/bogs as well. V. angustifolium and V. myrtilloides occur only in portions of eastern Miami lands; while the remaining three species occur in both eastern and western Miami lands
Related Sources  
Vaccinium sp. L.
Reference Source Notes Data Comments
Bush, L. L 1996   Human charred remains of Vaccinium sp. were recovered from an excavation site at an early Miami Village at the forks of the Wabash River (Ft Wayne), 1795-1812 (Ehler Site).
No Reference Specified   Pow Wow by Pokagon band of Potawatomi tribe held on Labor Day in St. Patricks Park near South Bend; Indiana; celebrates the end of blueberry season; and important ritual to this band who were farmers; hunters and gatherers
Dunn, J.P. 1919   Dunn quotes Perrot who compares the Illinois/Miami with the
Bush, L. L 1996   Archaeological studies in central and south-central Indiana revealed that blueberries were utilized as a food source by indigenous peoples sometime during the period of A.D. 1000 to A.D. 1450