Species Detail


Roots various species


Scientific Name:  
Common Name:  
Roots various species
Myaamia Name:  
aciipihki
Uses:  
Food, Medicinal
Harvest Seasons:  
Winter
Habitats:  
Oak Forest including Oak-Hickory, Beech-Oak-Maple Mixed Mesophytic, Dry Prairie grasslands, Wet Prairie grasslands with flooding
Locations:  
Undetermined
Growth Forms:  
Shrub, Herb, Vine

Myaamia Archival Sources  
Reference Source Reference Type Archival Data Comments
Pease, Theodore Calvin and Raymond C. Werner 1934 Use - Medicinal  root used to cure rattlesnake bite.
Throwbridge, C.C 1938 Use - Food 
Throwbridge, C.C 1938 Use - Medicinal  emetics.
Throwbridge, C.C 1938 Use - Medicinal  treatment for rheumatism is to apply pounded roots and weeds with a bandage to affected areas.
Throwbridge, C.C 1938 Use - Medicinal  a kind of homeopathic medicine using roots. Some medicine men used the same root that conveys the disease to cure it.
Throwbridge, C.C 1938 Use - Medicinal  special medicine men could cure a patient of a disease originating from a poison. The medicine man coughs up a white substance; places it in his hand. If it goes through the medicine mans hand; the patient will die; if it does not; he will live. Before this is known; the medicine man give the patient a small supply of roots and tells him to have good faith; then leaves.
Throwbridge, C.C 1938 Use - Food  keeshikeehaukee is a small plant growing in the dry prairies; and is about six inches in height; with small roots about an inch long growing in a cluster. These are boiled and eaten with sugar.
Throwbridge, C.C 1938 Use - Food  waukeepaaneekee is a plant growing in the bottom lands that is similar to the onion in root and shape. It is boiled 12 hours before eaten. It is not a popular food because it causes constipation.
Pease, Theodore Calvin and Raymond C. Werner 1934 Horticultural Info  Village location sometimes was chosen for its nearness to an abundance of root crops
Gravier, J. ca. 1700 Horticultural Info  A digging stick was used for gathering roots or potatoes.
Gravier, J. ca. 1700 Horticultural Info  The Old Illinois term nimic8picahan translates to modern French as Since this directly follows the entry for macopines; it proably refers to a harvesting methods of this; and other edible aquatic roots Gonellas note; –
Botanical Sources  
No sources entered.
Related Sources  
No sources entered.